Evolution of Cooking Food Over Time

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The “true story of cooking food” as we understand it today, begins with the history of man.

The history of food and gastronomy, in general, is a path closely linked to the events that have marked social action over the centuries. The search for food and the struggle to obtain it has often led to the growth of (or disappearance) entire civilizations, giving rise to extreme wars and great migrations of peoples.

But let’s briefly see the history of cooking through the ages.

An image of cooking in stove.

True Forms of Cooking 

The first true forms of cooking milestones, in the history of cooking, appear immediately with man, since the primitive era. In fact, in the caves, the cooking of the food was practiced on the open fire to make some natural foods edible, otherwise difficult to eat.

Discovered Fire

An image of cooking in fire.

The fire was the actual discovery that introduced the kitchen and with which the meat could be prepared. We then went on to cook vegetable elements, such as seeds and plants, and the first ceramic bowls and pots were produced, which date back to the 6th millennium BC. They cooked cereal polenta, unleavened bread, and foods. A little later, fermentation was discovered, which allowed the creation of leavened bread and some alcoholic drinks such as beer.

Favorite Dishes

Every place in the world had its favorite customs and dishes. For example, in ancient Egypt, there was a wide choice of bread and sweets based on eggs, honey, and milk. While in Greece, fish was preferred in various ways, such as baked, in soup, or fried.

Tasty Heart of the House 

The historical events, of the beginning of the century, had greatly affected the way we eat, flattening and, impoverishing it, and we will have to wait until the 1960s to finally rediscover a real culinary dynamism and the overbearing return of the kitchen, like the tasty heart of the house.

Less Time in Kitchen 

Unfortunately, today the kitchen is used quickly, especially during the week: the role of the woman’s role has changed drastically, and the work absorbs it much more than once. The average meal of the week lasts just under half an hour! That’s why the kitchen has changed a lot in recent years, and its purchase requires a careful assessment of family wants.

Middle Ages 

We begin to find more evident particles and pieces of the kitchen’s history, in the noble villas, and in the houses of the rich, where there were rooms dedicated to the kitchen.

In the middle ages, the poor cooked in a saucepan set to heat on the fireplace, while the kitchens of the castles and rich palaces, over the centuries, looked more and more like immense workshops where lavish banquets were prepared for hundreds of guests at a time, and even thousands. 

In short, the history of cooking is as old as man is ancient, and it was likely born from a casual discovery, just as the discovery of fire was casual.

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